Monday , May 10 2021

Physicists create new, simpler than never quantum "exhausting drives for fine" [Report]



Physicists at Alberta University in Canada have developed a new way to build quantum memories, a method for storing sensitive quantum information encoded into light impulses.


"We have developed a new way to store light impulses down to one photon level – in the clouds of the ultraviolet rubidium atoms, and later obtain them upon illumination of the" control "pulse of light," says Lindsay LeBlanc, professor of physics and Canada's chair for Ultracold gas research for quantum simulation. LeBlanc conducted this research with a post-doc colleague Erhan Saglamyurek.

Quantum memories are an important part of quantum networks that serve much the same roles as hard disks in today's computers. Interest in efficient and effective quantum data storage only grows with practical applications such as the Internet with quantum optical fiber and other secure communication methods.

"This experiment included short light impulses in which we could encode quantum information, store light in atoms, and then obtain the original pulse that carries the same information," explains Saglamyurek.

The new method developed by LeBlanc and Saglamyurek, which is most suited to key applications requiring high-speed operation, also has considerably fewer technical requirements than required in conventional quantum storage techniques. "For example, the amount of energy needed is considerably lower than current options, and these reduced requirements make it easier to implement in other laboratories," Saglamyurek added. This discovery will allow a substantial increase in quantum technologies, which has so far proved to be the greatest challenge in the emerging field.

The research team also included two students working at LeBlanc, Taras Hrushevskyi and Anindya Rastogi, and Khabat Heshami of the National Research Council in Ottawa. The paper "Coherent storage and handling of broadband photons using the dynamically controlled division of Autlera-Townes" was published in Natural photonics.

More information:
Erhan Saglamyurek et al., Coherent storage and manipulation of broadband photons through the dynamically controlled division of Autlera-Townes, Natural photonics (2018). DOI: 10.1038 / s41566-018-0279-0

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Physicists at Alberta University in Canada have developed a new way to build quantum memories, a method for storing sensitive quantum information encoded into light impulses.

"We have developed a new way to store light impulses down to one photon level – in the clouds of the ultraviolet rubidium atoms, and later obtain them upon illumination of the" control "pulse of light," says Lindsay LeBlanc, professor of physics and Canada's chair for Ultracold gas research for quantum simulation. LeBlanc conducted this research with a post-doc colleague Erhan Saglamyurek.

Quantum memories are an important part of quantum networks that serve much the same roles as hard disks in today's computers. Interest in efficient and effective quantum data storage only grows with practical applications such as the Internet with quantum optical fiber and other secure communication methods.

"This experiment included short light impulses in which we could encode quantum information, store light in atoms, and then obtain the original pulse that carries the same information," explains Saglamyurek.

The new method developed by LeBlanc and Saglamyurek, which is most suited to key applications requiring high-speed operation, also has considerably fewer technical requirements than required in conventional quantum storage techniques. "For example, the amount of energy needed is considerably lower than current options, and these reduced requirements make it easier to implement in other laboratories," Saglamyurek added. This discovery will allow a substantial increase in quantum technologies, which has so far proved to be the greatest challenge in the emerging field.

The research team also included two students working at LeBlanc, Taras Hrushevskyi and Anindya Rastogi, and Khabat Heshami of the National Research Council in Ottawa. The paper "Coherent storage and handling of broadband photons using the dynamically controlled division of Autlera-Townes" was published in Natural photonics.

More information:
Erhan Saglamyurek et al., Coherent storage and manipulation of broadband photons through the dynamically controlled division of Autlera-Townes, Natural photonics (2018). DOI: 10.1038 / s41566-018-0279-0


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